Chagas Disease FAQ


A parasitic infection called Chagas Disease has similarities to the early spread of HIV, according to research published recently in the journal PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases. Like AIDS, Chagas is hard to detect and has a long incubation period

Researchers are warning that the little-known Chagas Disease could pose a threat similar to other global pandemics. Chagas Disease, which experts have described as the "new AIDS of the Americas," is a parasitic illness that is most commonly transmitted

A parasitic infection called Chagas Disease has similarities to the early spread of HIV, according to research published recently in the journal PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases. Like AIDS, Chagas is hard to detect and has a long incubation period

May 31, 2012 — Chagas disease is being called the new "AIDS of the Americas." The shocking comparison has put this neglected tropical disease in headlines around the world. Who's at risk? Is Chagas really as bad as AIDS?

Chagas disease, a tropical illness that is transmitted by biting insects, may pose a major unseen threat to poor populations in the Americas and Europe, according to a report published May 29 in the journal PLoS. The editorial, which was co-authored by

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